Metal guitarist Plays Slayer’s “Raining Blood” From Balcony While Under Lockdown in Italy: Watch

Enrico Monti is a member of the Italian death metal band Skulld.

Metal guitarist Plays Slayer’s “Raining Blood” From Balcony While Under Lockdown in Italy: Watch
Spencer Kaufman

Consequence of Sound

Italy has been one of the most hard-hit nations when it comes to the coronavirus pandemic, with the country under full lockdown. As a result, Italians are starting to get creative in the ways they deal with the crisis, including one metal guitarist who shredded Slayer’s “Raining Blood” from his balcony.

Last week, residents of Siena, Italy, broke out into a group rendition of the song “E Mentre Siena Dorme (And While Siena Sleeps)” from their windows, creating a beautiful moment for the embattled country.

Following suit, guitarist Enrico Monti, of the Italian death metal band Skulld, took to his balcony in his town of Bertinoro to play one of metal’s most iconic riffs, Slayer’s “Raining Blood”. In the Facebook clip, which was filmed by a roommate or friend of Monti’s, the only neighbor to be seen is a woman across the street, looking on with arms folded. Watch below.

Italy has been devastated by the coronavirus epidemic, with the highest death rate of any country. As of this posting, the European country has roughly 25,000 cases and 1,800 deaths thus far.


Cristina Scabbia of the Italian gothic metal band Lacuna Coil has urged fellow Italians and everyone else to take the pandemic seriously, stating the following on Instagram:

“We are all facing a very strange, never happened before, moment. This virus is NOT like a common flu and spreads FAST. It is crucial now to protect ourselves in order to protect the lives of the loved ones and the weakest ones and to help our health system that is collapsing because there will not be space for everyone soon in health cares.”

See Enrico Monti performing “Raining Blood” from his balcony, as well as Cristina Scabbia’s Instagram post, below.

Metal guitarist Plays Slayer’s “Raining Blood” From Balcony While Under Lockdown in Italy: Watch
Spencer Kaufman

Album Review: Code Orange Deliver on Every Promise with Underneath

The Lowdown: Pittsburgh metallic hardcore outfit Code Orange flirted with mainstream sensibility on their last album, 2017’s Forever. That LP split its time between the virulent and metallic sound they mastered earlier in their career and a newfound melodic …

Album Review: Code Orange Deliver on Every Promise with Underneath
Spencer Kaufman

Consequence of Sound

The Lowdown: Pittsburgh metallic hardcore outfit Code Orange flirted with mainstream sensibility on their last album, 2017’s Forever. That LP split its time between the virulent and metallic sound they mastered earlier in their career and a newfound melodic (even radio-friendly) sensibility. On their ambitious follow-up, Underneath, they fuse both sides of their personality together and expand even further, with a new focus on technicality and electronic elements. Code Orange follow every creative impulse, and in doing so, deliver their best and most original album thus far.

The Good: Underneath is the record Code Orange have been threatening to deliver since they had the word “Kids” in their name. It foregrounds glitchy industrial touches and synthesizes them with a chaotic, mathematical approach without sacrificing the melodic ground that the band gained on Forever. If anything, these songs are more memorable and cohesive than those on its predecessor. Drummer-vocalist Jami Morgan and guitarist-vocalist Reba Meyers have perfected their twin-throated approach, and also sharpened their hooks to a practically atom-thick point.

On tracks like “Sulphur Surrounding” and especially the late-game powerhouse “Autumn and Carbine”, Code Orange weave the clean vocal hooks that made “Bleeding the Blur” such a revelation without deviating from the low of the record as a whole. Elsewhere, on “You and You Alone”, Morgan takes point and delivers a similarly anthemic song without any melody at all. These songs are impressive in their own right, but Underneath doesn’t play like a collection of singles. Instead, repeated use of samples as motifs and some clever sequencing lend it the kind of narrative flow listeners might expect from a concept album by a progressive rock band — and like the best concept records, it begs for a repeat listen when it’s over.

The Bad: It’s a struggle to find a single bad thing to say about Underneath. Some purists will say the record kowtows to the returning popularity of nu-metal tropes, and there’s some truth in that statement. Morgan’s occasional rap-inflected delivery telegraphs nostalgia for the radio-metal sound that dominated the turn of the century. However, Code Orange commit to those choices without coming across corny or hackneyed. The lyrics could be a little more emotionally nuanced, but this is metallic hardcore — it’s not meant to be Robert Frost.

The Verdict: In 2020, Code Orange have entered their imperial phase. Underneath spreads its tendrils in every direction, reaches into the coffers of diverse genres like grunge, industrial, death metal, intellectual dance music, and assimilates them all into a cohesive whole. More impressively, it does so without sacrificing their hardcore roots. It delivers on every promise in a sleek, incredibly catchy package and does it all in under 50 minutes. Yes, it’s music made by young adults obviously aimed at young adults. Yes, it could be more subtle about its influences. And yes, it’s going to make a whole lot of year-end lists.

Essential Tracks: “Swallowing the Rabbit Whole”, “You and You Alone”, “Sulfur Surrounding”, “Autumn and Carbine”, “Underneath”

Album Review: Code Orange Deliver on Every Promise with Underneath
Spencer Kaufman

Coronavirus Tour Postponements: Deafheaven, Alice Cooper, Killswitch Engage, Sepultura, Lamb of God, and Evanescence

The list of metal and hard rock bands postponing tours as a result of the coronavirus epidemic continues to grow.

Coronavirus Tour Postponements: Deafheaven, Alice Cooper, Killswitch Engage, Sepultura, Lamb of God, and Evanescence
Spencer Kaufman

Consequence of Sound

With each passing day, more tours are being postponed in the wake of the coronavirus epidemic. As far as metal and hard rock acts are concerned, Deafheaven, Alice Cooper, Killswitch Engage, Sepultura, Lamb of God, and Evanescence are among the latest bands to alter their touring plans.

Deafheaven were scheduled to embark on a 10th anniversary North American tour on March 20th, but the six-week trek has been postponed until further notice. The outing was set to feature support from Inter Arma, Greet Death, and All Your Sisters.

Alice Cooper, meanwhile, issued a press release stating that his spring North American tour, which was set to run from March 31st through April 22nd, will be rescheduled for the fall. Dates will be announced in the coming weeks. As of now, Cooper’s summer run with Lita Ford and Tesla is still on schedule.

Killswitch Engage had just kicked off a North American outing with August Burns Red earlier this week, only getting two shows in before having to postpone the tour. In a Facebook message, Killswitch stated that they “definitely plan on coming back soon to play for all of you.”

Brazilian metal veterans Sepultura will also postpone their spring North American tour until the fall. Crowbar, Sacred Reich, and Art of Shock were also on that bill.

Overseas, Lamb of God will reschedule their planned UK and Europe tour with Kreator and Power Trip. Fans are being asked to hold onto their tickets to use for the as-yet-unannounced new dates.


Evanescence and Within Temptation have been forced to postpone their joint European tour, as well, with Evanescence promising that they are “busy locking in new dates for this fall.”

Keep up with the latest postponements and cancellations due to the coronavirus pandemic via our regularly updated list of affected events.

Coronavirus Tour Postponements: Deafheaven, Alice Cooper, Killswitch Engage, Sepultura, Lamb of God, and Evanescence
Spencer Kaufman

Decibel Magazine Tour, Headlined by Mayhem and Abbath, Canceled Due to Coronavirus Pandemic

The annual extreme-metal outing will not take place this year, as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.

Decibel Magazine Tour, Headlined by Mayhem and Abbath, Canceled Due to Coronavirus Pandemic
Spencer Kaufman

Consequence of Sound

The “Decibel Magazine Tour” has been canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic. The North American trek, which was to be co-headlined by legendary extreme-metal bands Mayhem and Abbath, was set to kick off this Friday (March 13th) in Denver.

The monthlong outing was also set to feature Gatecreeper and Idle Hands, and had been scheduled to run through an April 10th show in Chicago.

Decibel magazine issued the following statement to explain the decision:

“In an effort to control the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, numerous states and cities on the Decibel Magazine Tour routing have announced bans on gatherings in excess of 250 or 500 people (with many more expected to do the same in the coming days). As a result, we have been forced to cancel the Decibel Magazine Tour. Though it pains us to see so many plans disrupted as a result, we must remain committed to ensuring the safety of the bands, their crew, venue staff and, of course, the fans during this time.

For ticket refunds, please inquire at point of purchase. Thanks for your understanding and support of Mayhem, Abbath, Gatecreeper, Idle Hands and Decibel.”

The announcement comes as the concert industry comes to a virtual standstill in the States, as major promoters such as Live Nation and AEG plan to hit pause on tours for the foreseeable future.


See our updated list for the latest cancellations and postponements resulting from the coronavirus epidemic.

Decibel Magazine Tour, Headlined by Mayhem and Abbath, Canceled Due to Coronavirus Pandemic
Spencer Kaufman

Tool, KISS, and More Postpone Shows Over Coronavirus Concerns

More and more rock bands are postponing shows in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

Tool, KISS, and More Postpone Shows Over Coronavirus Concerns
Spencer Kaufman

Consequence of Sound

Given that Live Nation and AEG plan to halt all touring for the foreseeable future, it’s no surprise that major rock bands are announcing postponements at a rapid rate. Tool and KISS are among the many acts whose upcoming shows have been affected as a result of the current coronavirus pandemic.

Tool had a handful of Pacific Northwest scheduled for this month, and were able to play shows this week in Spokane, Washington, and Portland, Oregon. However, Thursday night’s show (March 12th) in Eugene, Oregon, has been postponed “due to the restriction on group gatherings of over 250 people that is now effective per the state of Oregon’s announcement late last night.”

The progressive metal band has two additional concerts scheduled in the coming days for Boise, Idaho, and Salt Lake City, Utah. As of this posting, those shows are still scheduled to take place, as Tool’s full spring North American tour, which kicks off in mid April.

KISS, meanwhile, have rescheduled the last three shows of their spring North American run “out of an abundance of caution”. Those dates will now take place as part of the veteran rock band’s fall leg (new dates in parenthesis): Tulsa, Oklahoma (October 4th) ; Biloxi, Mississippi (October 6th); and Lafayette, Louisiana (October 7th).


Among the other metal and hard rock acts who’ve announced tour postponements in the past 24 hours is Devin Townsend, who has postponed the remainder of his North American tour. In addition, The Who have postponed their UK and Ireland tour, while Machine Head have done the same for their European tour.

The coronavirus pandemic has forced the cancellations and postponements of many more high-profile tours, festivals, and events. Keep up with this updated list of affected events.

Tool, KISS, and More Postpone Shows Over Coronavirus Concerns
Spencer Kaufman

Zakk Wylde Plots New Black Label Society Album, Hopes to Resume Ozzy Osbourne Tour

Wylde will spend the next three months working on the new Black Label Society album.

Zakk Wylde Plots New Black Label Society Album, Hopes to Resume Ozzy Osbourne Tour
Spencer Kaufman

Consequence of Sound

As Ozzy Osbourne’s touring guitarist, Zakk Wylde’s schedule has been turned upside down two years in a row. With Ozzy postponing all of his 2019 tour dates, and then canceling his 2020 North American tour, Wylde has been turning his attention to his other projects, including his own band, Black Label Society.

In a new interview with Billboard, Wylde said he’ll use the coming months to write and record a new Black Label Society album, the follow-up to 2018’s Grimmest Hits. The band is currently on tour through March 28th, and from there the focus will be on writing and recording new music.

“I’m going to do some writing, I guess, in April, and [in] May and [then in] June, we’ll [record] and have that one ready to roll,” Wylde revealed. “I don’t demo or stockpile shit. Never have. I’m not like Prince, where he’s recording stuff all the time. I just like to come up with a riff or an idea and be like, ‘Why don’t we track that one today?’ It’s like the beginning of a new season. It’s always fun.”

Wylde had rejoined Osbourne’s touring band a few years ago, and the “No More Tours 2” trek was off to a very successful start in 2018 before being derailed by Ozzy’s various health setbacks. As mentioned, Ozzy canceled his 2020 North American tour, which had already been rescheduled from last year. The metal legend will instead seek treatments for his battle with Parkinson’s disease, as well as continue to recover from a nasty fall last year.

Despite Ozzy’s health battles, Wylde is confident that the tour will eventually resume. “As far as with the boss, Ozzy’s taking his vitamins and hitting the iron, and just healing up and getting ready. And when he’s ready, we’ll roll,” remarked the guitarist.


He added, “If it was up to Ozzy, we [would have been] doing shows six months ago. He wants to go. He’s like, ‘F–k, this sucks. I can still do it. The last tour was so good!’ I’m just like, ‘You’ll know when you’re ready. No one’s going away, dude. You’ll know when you’re ready. It’s just a matter of time.'”

Wylde is also working with his Black Sabbath tribute band, Zakk Sabbath, on a track-for-track version of Black Sabbath’s 1970 debut album. “I’ve been listening to that record since I was 11, 12 years old, and playing those songs since I started playing guitar,” said Wylde.

Zakk Wylde Plots New Black Label Society Album, Hopes to Resume Ozzy Osbourne Tour
Spencer Kaufman

Fleshgod Apocalypse, Russian Circles, Torche, and Sammy Hagar Postpone Tours Over Coronavirus Concerns

The latest metal and hard rock cancellations and postponements related to the coronavirus pandemic.

Fleshgod Apocalypse, Russian Circles, Torche, and Sammy Hagar Postpone Tours Over Coronavirus Concerns
Spencer Kaufman

Consequence of Sound

The coronavirus crisis has just been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization, and it continues to greatly affect the music industry. In the world of metal and hard rock, Fleshgod Apocalypse, Russian Circles, Torche, and Sammy Hagar have just postponed or canceled tours.

Fleshgod Apocalypse were set to tour North America beginning March 16th in Dallas. The Italian symphonic metallers were especially looking forward to this particular outing, as they were set to be accompanied by a classical string quartet throughout the run.

In a press release, Fleshgod Apocalypse issued the following statement:

“It is with heavy hearts that we must announce the postponement of our upcoming tour in North America with the Veleno String Quartet and [opening act] The Agonist. This has been decided upon due to current entry restrictions in the United States, following recent cases of coronavirus in Italy. We’re absolutely devastated about the delay, but we’re already working to reschedule the tour for late Summer/early Fall (exact dates coming soon).”

Russian Circles and Torche, meanwhile, were supposed to tour Europe together this spring, with Russian Circles stating the following about the tour postponement via Facebook:

“It’s with heavy hearts that we’re announcing the postponement of our European tour with Torche due to the increasing government pressure to limit public events in the wake of the coronavirus. We’ve been watching the day-by-day developments closely and all the patterns seem to indicate that the measures imposed by countries like Italy will likely be the model for most of Western Europe in the next few weeks, effectively cancelling the majority of our shows.

Beyond government restrictions, we also have to consider the health of our audiences and the people working our shows. We’ve played shows with broken fingers. We’ve played shows with vomit buckets hidden behind our amps because members of the band we’re dealing with stomach flus. We’ve played shows days after members have come out of surgery. We’ve played through any number of physical, emotional, or financial hardships, but unfortunately we have to make an exception this time around.”

Finally, Sammy Hagar & The Circle have canceled their South American tour of Chile and Brazil, which was set to kick off in a few days. Hagar issued the following statement via Instagram:

“The upcoming Sammy Hagar & The Circle shows in South America have been cancelled, due to the escalation of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). The decision has been made along with the local promoters in order to reduce potential health risks in response to the current global health crisis.”

These latest announcements come after the cancellation of South by Southwest and the postponement of Coachella festival, as well as Pearl Jam’s decision to postpone their spring North American tour. Here’s an updated list of the latest events and tours affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

Fleshgod Apocalypse, Russian Circles, Torche, and Sammy Hagar Postpone Tours Over Coronavirus Concerns
Spencer Kaufman

Glenn Danzig Announces Intimate “Danzig Sings Elvis” Shows

Glenn Danzig’s Danzig Sings Elvis album will arrive on April 17th.

Glenn Danzig Announces Intimate “Danzig Sings Elvis” Shows
Spencer Kaufman

Consequence of Sound

Glenn Danzig will celebrate his long-awaited Danzig Sings Elvis album by playing intimate shows in San Francisco and Los Angeles next month.

The legendary rocker’s Danzig Sings Elvis album, which he first mentioned years ago, arrives on April 17th. Surrounding its release, the Vegas-style “Danzig Sings Elvis” gigs will take place April 17th at Bimbo’s 365 Club in San Francisco and April 22nd at the Roosevelt Hotel Grand Ballroom in Los Angeles.

Tickets for the LA concert go on sale this Friday (March 13th) and start at $169.50 each. According to the show description, “Glenn Danzig will be performing an intimate seated live concert accompanied by a pianist and a night club style band.”

The album Danzig Sings Elvis will feature the Misfits’ frontman covering 14 lesser known Elvis Presley songs, such as “It Is So Strange”, “One Night”, and “Loving Arms”.


Beyond the two California gigs, Glenn Danzig will play more traditional rock shows with his eponymous band this summer in Europe. The band Danzig will also headline the Psycho Las Vegas festival in August. Pick up tickets to Danzig’s upcoming shows here.

In addition, Danzig will front the Original Misfits for their only scheduled 2020 show on May 2nd at the Domination Festival in Mexico City.

Danzig 2020 Tour Dates:
04/17 – San Francisco, CA @ Bimbo’s 365 Club *
04/22 – Los Angeles, CA @ Roosevelt Hotel Grand Ballroom *
07/31 – Szekesfehervar, HU @ Fezen Festival
08/01 – Munich, DE @ Circus Krone
08/02 – Zurich, CH @ Volkshaus
08/04 – Copenhagen, DK @ Amager Bio
08/05 – Oslo, NO @ Sentrum Scene
08/07 – Koln, DE @ E-werk
08/08 – Hildesheim, DE @ Mera Luna Festival
08/09 – Wiesbaden, DE @ Schachthof
08/15 – Las Vegas, NV @ Psycho Las Vegas

* = “Danzig Sings Elvis” shows

Glenn Danzig Announces Intimate “Danzig Sings Elvis” Shows
Spencer Kaufman

Heavy Culture: Living Colour’s Corey Glover on Brooklyn Roots, Race, New Projects, ShipRocked + More

Living Colour singer Corey Glover chats with Heavy Consequence for the latest Heavy Culture column.

Heavy Culture: Living Colour’s Corey Glover on Brooklyn Roots, Race, New Projects, ShipRocked + More
Spencer Kaufman

Consequence of Sound

Heavy Culture is a monthly column from journalist Liz Ramanand, focusing on artists of different cultural backgrounds in heavy music as they offer their perspectives on race, society, and more as it intersects with and affects their music. The latest installment of this column features an interview with the Living Colour vocalist Corey Glover.

Singer Corey Glover has been displaying his impressive vocal range fronting Living Colour since 1985. This year, the rock pioneers are celebrating 30 years of their sophomore album, Time’s Up, which yielded such hits as “Type”, “Love Rears Its Ugly Head” and “Elvis Is Dead”.

We caught up with Glover on the high seas during this year’s ShipRocked Cruise to talk about talk about the experience of being on the floating festival, along with some current musical projects he’s working on, including his more metal venture Disciples of Verity.

Glover also spoke about growing up in Brooklyn, diversity in rock and metal, and why more black artists need to speak openly about race and adversity.

Read our our interview with Living Colour singer Corey Glover for the latest installment of Heavy Culture below:

On his family roots and cultural background

My mother was born in a town called Meigs in Georgia and my father was a bastard child — he and his 15-year-old mother had to leave South Carolina because she was pregnant with him so they moved around and then moved to Brooklyn. I have an older sister and an older brother, my sister was born in Harlem and then my brother came around and they were like, “Oh this is too many people” so they tried to find somewhere to live, so they moved to Crown Heights. Then 10 years later I showed up! [Laughs]

On growing up in Crown Heights, Brooklyn

That was one of the first parts of Brooklyn because Crown Heights, at the end of the Civil War, it’s where slaves moved to. They used to call that section of Brooklyn Crow Hill. Dig that! It was really a black enclave and at the turn of the century, the Irish moved in because it was cheap and that pushed people out to Oceanside and Bed Stuy but Crown Heights has a richness going on and the music that came out of there was just nuts.

On the musical influence of Crown Heights

Everybody was there, every kind of music I wanted to get into was right there. I went down to the corner to the Puerto Rican bodega and Héctor Lavoe was on. I had my Trini [Trinidadian] friends listening to [Mighty] Sparrow and all of that – all of the musical influences of my life were right in my neighborhood. Some folks were doing jazz, some were doing blues, some folks were doing R&B – everything was there and the church, where I met all of these folks. [Laughs] It was there for the taking, right in front of me.

You know Bob Dylan lived in Crown Heights for a minute? He wanted to study under the Grand Rebbe [Schneerson] on Eastern Parkway? It’s surreal! Mr. Zimmerman [Bob Dylan] found his roots and decided he wanted to be a Jew again so he lived in Crown Heights. [Laughs] And nobody gave a f–k. He would walk around with this big ass coat and hat but he didn’t even need to do that because nobody gave a f–k. But that’s the kind of energy that Crown Heights had and still does to a degree. For whatever reason, the hipsters with kids moved into Crown Heights, and they happen to have a band and they realize what’s going on.

On the 30th anniversary of Living Colour’s Time’s Up

Man! [Laughs] We were rehearsing and ideas were coming quick. We were on this high, we understand how this works, let’s go and make it happen. We were all feeling ourselves at that point, we can do whatever we want. We couldn’t but we thought we could. Putting the record out and then going on the road with it we realized there was a shift and change going on in the country. This is when [President George H.W.] Bush came along and there was a real pushback to the idea of diversity. It really was, “We still don’t know what to do with you guys” — but you knew three years ago. What happened now?

It’s not like we didn’t get some recognition for our work. It was really weird playing because all they wanted to do was put us with Fishbone or Spies and make that a thing. But we had just as much in common with them as we did with Primus or the [Red Hot] Chili Peppers but they didn’t want to hear that, which was really telling as to where the country still is. Ain’t shit changed at all. [Laughs]

On whether he sees more diversity in the rock and metal genres today

Shit hasn’t really changed but the means of making it happen are. There’s no place for me to go find metal, metal finds me. I don’t have to go to Dingbatz to hear metal. I can just open up my iPad and it’s there, the algorithm has found me. “Okay, you like Meshuggah, Lamb of God, Drop D, God Forbid” — it finds you. That’s why I’m in a band with Corey [Pierce]. When I saw God Forbid in the early 2000s I was like, “No shit, so it’s out there!”

I don’t know if this is the way folks want it but some don’t want you to announce that you’re black — just play. That’s bullshit. It’s going to come out, somehow you’re going to get it whether you believe it or not. You’re going to have to deal with it. Even the bands themselves are like, “We don’t really want to talk about it” but you’re going to have to.

They were conditioned to think it’s not important, the music is what’s important. We’ve been f—ed up so much — people saying, “Music has no color,” but it does! What you’re doing, those four chords you’re playing are based on the blues, based in Africa, this has cultural significance in your world. The fact that you’re a part of it and they don’t want you to talk about it is something to be said.

They accept you when you play it but don’t accept you when you talk about it is where it comes from. And that’s the downfall of us – people are like “I understand but you always talk about that black shit” yes of course we do. Guess what? We’re black. [Laughs]

White supremacy exists in our lives, every day. I live in some little podunk town which is like the brown dot in the Hudson Valley, you go north and its Poughkeepsie and you go south, its Westchester. It’s a sanctuary city, there’s a lot of Peruvians, Hondurans, and South Americans living in this town but you step right outside it – you don’t understand how entrenched you’re in it on a daily basis. You thought you were running away from us but it’s not going to happen. Sorry. [Laughs] Go to Iowa.

Don’t think that you’re not going to escape this because it will become very clear to you as a band or as an artist that decides, “I’m not going to let color become part of me”— go to Oklahoma and walk into the grocery store and watch the records stop. We’ve been through that. How are you not going to deal with that?

On women of color in rock and metal

They’re around, Militia [Vox] is the greatest and there are others. It goes back to the conversation either they’re African Queens and embrace it or they completely push it to the side. So they’re marginalized by being there with their fists in the air and then turned invisible on the other side.

There is a culture for [black women in rock and metal], there is a place for this that’s not AfroPunk that’s not even BRC [Black Rock Coalition], that is underground to a degree. It has to have a bigger support system this and themselves. People who go and see Militia do her thing are her friends and someone that thinks she’s cute and there’s much more to it than just that.

There’s more – Honeychild, they’re just not part of the algorithm that Spotify is going to show you to. They haven’t built that algorithm and we have to figure out how that’s done and we have to be part of the system for it to be done and include these artists in these programs.

On his new project Disciples of Verity

I’ve wanted to do a real metal record for a very long time and I was trying to figure out how to do that. I was at NAMM three or four years ago and George Pond [Disciples of Verity bassist] was like, “I have some tracks I want you to hear, I just want you to sing on one.” So I went and did one track and then three tracks and then seven tracks. I kept digging what he was playing and I felt like I can contribute to it. It just kept getting better.

I’m also doing a project with Mike Orlando, and he’s doing the funkiest shit I’ve ever heard him play! So those two projects I’m loving. Disciples helps me get that raw [aggression] out and Living Colour has moved on from that, it’s not a new-wave hardcore band anymore – they’re elder statesmen and I still want to do Bad Brains shit.

On what keeps him coming back to ShipRocked Cruise

You know what these are folks who are very loyal to these bands. We went on the road with Alter Bridge in Europe and folks [from ShipRocked] came from all over because they saw it was Alter Bridge and us. This is how you make new forever fans — you had a drink with them, they saw you on the buffet line, they were behind you while you’re getting your omelet looking like a fool, but now I know them. It’s a connection that you’re never going to get anywhere else; the internet is never going to do that kind of thing, you’re never going to get those intimate moments with fans and you make lasting impressions this way. You can’t beat that.

On another ShipRocked act that he admires

Hyro [the Hero]! He is the shit. [Laughs] What he is doing is going to change what we were talking about earlier because he’s dealing with it. He’s using his aggression in his music to talk about what he’s going through. I love that, it’s amazing to me. It’s a product of the times that we live in. Things are going to change and it’s going to be spectacular.

A part of it is the expression and if you can relate to the expression – when we first started out it was like yeah we’re this black hard rock band so everybody either thought we were [trying to be] white boys but once they heard it, they got it. This is just an expression of yourself in the context of being a person of color in this particular environment.

People can relate to that sort of aggression that Hyro and [a lot of other bands] are trying to put across; they relate to that on their own terms not as a social choice. I get that anger and aggression — pumped up to do something. I can appreciate it for what it is.

Heavy Culture: Living Colour’s Corey Glover on Brooklyn Roots, Race, New Projects, ShipRocked + More
Spencer Kaufman

R.I.P. Keith Olsen, Producer of Fleetwood Mac, Ozzy Osbourne, Scorpions Albums Dies

Keith Olsen was also a member of the ’60s garage band The Music Machine, who recorded the hit “Talk Talk”.

R.I.P. Keith Olsen, Producer of Fleetwood Mac, Ozzy Osbourne, Scorpions Albums Dies
Spencer Kaufman

Consequence of Sound

Keith Olsen, who produced notable albums by Fleetwood Mac, Scorpions, Ozzy Osbourne, Rick Springfield, and many more artists, has passed away. At this time, no cause of death has been revealed.

The news of Olsen’s passing was reported by Scorpions, who wrote on Facebook, “We just learned about the passing of our dear friend and producer Keith Olsen. Keith produced many iconic albums, including our album Crazy World.”

The veteran hard rock band added, “Keith was a wonderful guy, and the making of Crazy World was such an inspiring journey, containing outstanding songs like ‘Wind of Change’ and ‘Send Me an Angel,’ which had the Keith Olsen touch on every single note.”

Olsen, who was born in South Dakota, first made a name for himself as the bassist in the proto-punk garage band The Music Machine, who scored a hit in 1966 with the song “Talk Talk”. After the band broke up in 1969, he turned his attention toward production.

He proved to be a key figure in the career path of Fleetwood Mac. First he produced the 1973 album Buckingham Nicks, the self-titled effort from Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks. After that, he introduced the pair to Mick Fleetwood, who brought them in as members of Fleetwood Mac, ushering a new era of the band. Olsen then produced Fleetwood Mac’s 1975 self-titled effort, a seven-times platinum LP that contains such classics as “Rhiannon” and “Landslide”.


Olsen also made a name for himself in the world of hard rock. In addition to Scorpions’ Crazy World, he produced such albums as Whitesnake’s multiplatinum 1987 self-titled LP; Ozzy Osbourne’s No Rest for the Wicked; Foreigner’s Double Vision; Heart’s Passionworks; and countless others.

Rick Springfield also paid tribute to Olsen, crediting him with identifying his biggest hit early on in the recording process. “My amazing and talented friend Keith Olsen has passed away,” wrote Springfield on Facebook. “He didn’t produce all those hits for all those musicians for no reason. He had a golden ear and helped so many people reach their potential. I remember playing him my demos and he picked ‘Jessie’s Girl’ out of a batch of 15 songs and said, ‘This is a hit.’”

Olsen also produced some notable film soundtracks, including Flashdance and Footloose, and mixed the Top Gun soundtrack.

See Keith Olsen performing bass on “Talk Talk” with his band The Music Machine in the video below.

R.I.P. Keith Olsen, Producer of Fleetwood Mac, Ozzy Osbourne, Scorpions Albums Dies
Spencer Kaufman

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