R. Kelly’s Trial Defense Opens With Two Witnesses Vouching for Singer’s Behavior

Dhanai Ramnanan and Larry Hood claim they’ve never seen the singer commit a litany of accused abuses, though the prosecution swiftly attempted to dismantle their argument

Music – Rolling Stone

Dhanai Ramnanan and Larry Hood claim they've never seen the singer commit a litany of accused abuses, though the prosecution swiftly attempted to dismantle their argument

R. Kelly’s Trial Defense Opens With Two Witnesses Vouching for Singer’s Behavior

Dhanai Ramnanan and Larry Hood claim they’ve never seen the singer commit a litany of accused abuses, though the prosecution swiftly attempted to dismantle their argument

Music – Rolling Stone

Dhanai Ramnanan and Larry Hood claim they've never seen the singer commit a litany of accused abuses, though the prosecution swiftly attempted to dismantle their argument

Courtney Barnett acknowledges similarities between hers and Melbourne band Quivers’ music videos

“I thought I had come up with a beautiful, original idea for a video, but it seems like I was wrong,” Barnett said

The post Courtney Barnett acknowledges similarities between hers and Melbourne band Quivers’ music videos appeared first on NME.

NME

Courtney Barnett has acknowledged similarities between the recently released music video for her single ‘Before You Gotta Go’ and fellow Melbourne act Quivers’ clip for ‘You’re Not Always On My Mind’.

Both music videos feature the respective musicians heading out into the field and recording audio samples from the natural world. Additionally, the lyric from Barnett’s song, “You’re always on my mind”, is similar to the title of the Quivers song.

Quivers’ video, directed by Nina Renee, was filmed on the island of Toarra-Marra-Monah (also known as Maria Island in Tasmania), as well as Woiwurrung and Boon Wurrung country (Melbourne).

Barnett’s video, directed by Claudia Sangiorgi Dalimore and released a year and half later, was also filmed on Woiwurrung and Boon Wurrung country, in addition to unceded Indigenous land in Aotearoa (New Zealand).

Watch both videos below:

On social media, Barnett promoted the Quivers video, saying “I thought I had come up with a beautiful, original idea for a video, but it seems like I was wrong”.

“I’d like to introduce you to Melbourne band [Quivers] and director [Nina Renee] who had the same idea way before me,” she wrote.

“Any similarities are completely coincidental and if I had seen this clip when I was making mine I would have completely changed my concept or the way we explored it.”

The music video’s description on YouTube has also been amended to acknowledge the similarities.

“The resemblance is uncanny, but it’s entirely coincedental [sic]. We respect and admire Quivers and Nina Renee and we appreciate them reaching out and having the conversation with us.”

On Facebook, Quivers wrote, “We want to thank Courtney Barnett for acknowledging the similarities between her clip and this one by Nina Renee for ‘You’re Not Always On My Mind’.”

‘Before You Gotta Go’ is lifted from Barnett’s forthcoming album ‘Things Take Time, Take Time’, due out November 12. ‘You’re Not Always On My Mind’ was included on Quivers’ album ‘Golden Doubt’, released back in June.

The post Courtney Barnett acknowledges similarities between hers and Melbourne band Quivers’ music videos appeared first on NME.

Courtney Barnett acknowledges similarities between hers and Melbourne band Quivers’ music videos

“I thought I had come up with a beautiful, original idea for a video, but it seems like I was wrong,” Barnett said

The post Courtney Barnett acknowledges similarities between hers and Melbourne band Quivers’ music videos appeared first on NME.

NME

Courtney Barnett has acknowledged similarities between the recently released music video for her single ‘Before You Gotta Go’ and fellow Melbourne act Quivers’ clip for ‘You’re Not Always On My Mind’.

Both music videos feature the respective musicians heading out into the field and recording audio samples from the natural world. Additionally, the lyric from Barnett’s song, “You’re always on my mind”, is similar to the title of the Quivers song.

Quivers’ video, directed by Nina Renee, was filmed on the island of Toarra-Marra-Monah (also known as Maria Island in Tasmania), as well as Woiwurrung and Boon Wurrung country (Melbourne).

Barnett’s video, directed by Claudia Sangiorgi Dalimore and released a year and half later, was also filmed on Woiwurrung and Boon Wurrung country, in addition to unceded Indigenous land in Aotearoa (New Zealand).

Watch both videos below:

On social media, Barnett promoted the Quivers video, saying “I thought I had come up with a beautiful, original idea for a video, but it seems like I was wrong”.

“I’d like to introduce you to Melbourne band [Quivers] and director [Nina Renee] who had the same idea way before me,” she wrote.

“Any similarities are completely coincidental and if I had seen this clip when I was making mine I would have completely changed my concept or the way we explored it.”

The music video’s description on YouTube has also been amended to acknowledge the similarities.

“The resemblance is uncanny, but it’s entirely coincedental [sic]. We respect and admire Quivers and Nina Renee and we appreciate them reaching out and having the conversation with us.”

On Facebook, Quivers wrote, “We want to thank Courtney Barnett for acknowledging the similarities between her clip and this one by Nina Renee for ‘You’re Not Always On My Mind’.”

‘Before You Gotta Go’ is lifted from Barnett’s forthcoming album ‘Things Take Time, Take Time’, due out November 12. ‘You’re Not Always On My Mind’ was included on Quivers’ album ‘Golden Doubt’, released back in June.

The post Courtney Barnett acknowledges similarities between hers and Melbourne band Quivers’ music videos appeared first on NME.

Slash posts teaser of new Guns N’ Roses song ‘Hard School’

The track was soundchecked ahead of their set in Chicago last week

The post Slash posts teaser of new Guns N’ Roses song ‘Hard School’ appeared first on NME.

NME

Guns N’ Roses have begun teasing their next release, with guitarist Slash posting a video of himself rehearsing a new song – currently unnamed, but widely believed to be titled ‘Hard School’ – in Chicago.

Though the track in question was not performed during the band’s set at Wrigley Field last Friday (September 17), they did give it a spin during their soundcheck, as Slash revealed in a recent TikTok.

Take a look at the video below:

@slash

Wrigley Field soundcheck Chicago 8.16.21 video by @meeganhodges iiii]; )’

♬ original sound – Slash

Rumours of the new song’s imminent release began to circulate last week, after a fan was reportedly told about it by frontman Axl Rose when the pair met backstage at a recent show in Atlantic City.

Initially minted with the working title ‘Jackie Chan’, the track was recorded during sessions for Guns N’ Roses’ notorious 2008 album ‘Chinese Democracy’, but never made the album. Short clips of the song have since been posted online, and a full version leaked in 2019.

If ‘Hard School’ does see a release in the near future, it’ll come as the band’s second for 2021, following the single ‘Absurd’ in August. The band debuted ‘Absurd’ – a reworking of another ‘Chinese Democracy’ outtake, ‘Silkworms’ – during a show in Boston that took place a few days before it was officially released.

Earlier this month, Guns N’ Roses had their set at California’s BottleRock festival cut short after they broke the event’s curfew. The band were part-way through a performance of ‘Paradise City’ – for which Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl made a guest appearance – when the stage’s power was abruptly cut.

In other Guns N’ Roses news, the band recently celebrated a new milestone for their 1998 classic ‘Sweet Child O’ Mine’, with the track surpassing a billion streams on Spotify last month. In July, they launched an official range of bongs and smoking accessories.

The post Slash posts teaser of new Guns N’ Roses song ‘Hard School’ appeared first on NME.

Slash posts teaser of new Guns N’ Roses song ‘Hard School’

The track was soundchecked ahead of their set in Chicago last week

The post Slash posts teaser of new Guns N’ Roses song ‘Hard School’ appeared first on NME.

NME

Guns N’ Roses have begun teasing their next release, with guitarist Slash posting a video of himself rehearsing a new song – currently unnamed, but widely believed to be titled ‘Hard School’ – in Chicago.

Though the track in question was not performed during the band’s set at Wrigley Field last Friday (September 17), they did give it a spin during their soundcheck, as Slash revealed in a recent TikTok.

Take a look at the video below:

@slash

Wrigley Field soundcheck Chicago 8.16.21 video by @meeganhodges iiii]; )’

♬ original sound – Slash

Rumours of the new song’s imminent release began to circulate last week, after a fan was reportedly told about it by frontman Axl Rose when the pair met backstage at a recent show in Atlantic City.

Initially minted with the working title ‘Jackie Chan’, the track was recorded during sessions for Guns N’ Roses’ notorious 2008 album ‘Chinese Democracy’, but never made the album. Short clips of the song have since been posted online, and a full version leaked in 2019.

If ‘Hard School’ does see a release in the near future, it’ll come as the band’s second for 2021, following the single ‘Absurd’ in August. The band debuted ‘Absurd’ – a reworking of another ‘Chinese Democracy’ outtake, ‘Silkworms’ – during a show in Boston that took place a few days before it was officially released.

Earlier this month, Guns N’ Roses had their set at California’s BottleRock festival cut short after they broke the event’s curfew. The band were part-way through a performance of ‘Paradise City’ – for which Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl made a guest appearance – when the stage’s power was abruptly cut.

In other Guns N’ Roses news, the band recently celebrated a new milestone for their 1998 classic ‘Sweet Child O’ Mine’, with the track surpassing a billion streams on Spotify last month. In July, they launched an official range of bongs and smoking accessories.

The post Slash posts teaser of new Guns N’ Roses song ‘Hard School’ appeared first on NME.

Morgan Wallen reportedly only donated a third of his promised $500,000 to Black-led organisations

A new report claims the disgraced country star has thus far only reached out to one group

The post Morgan Wallen reportedly only donated a third of his promised $500,000 to Black-led organisations appeared first on NME.

NME

Two months after Morgan Wallen first pledged to donate “around $500,000” (£366,000) to Black-led organisations, the disgraced country star has reportedly only committed a total of $165,000 (£121,000), which was given to a single group.

Wallen sparked controversy back in February after a video of him using a racial slur surfaced. He was subsequently dropped by a number of radio stations, as well as his record label, Big Loud. Despite as much, sales for his recent album ‘Dangerous’ surged, and Wallen maintained the Number One spot on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart for a record-breaking ten weeks.

His return to the spotlight came in May when he performed for the first time since the incriminating video leaked, making an appearance at Kid Rock’s Big Honky Tonk & Steakhouse bar in his hometown of Nashville. He returned to country radio in June, and the following month, appeared on Good Morning America to discuss his controversy.

During the interview, Wallen committed to making amends, telling host Michael Strahan: “Me and my team noticed that whenever this whole incident happened, that there was a spike in my sales. So we tried to calculate … how much it had spiked from this incident. We got to a number somewhere around $500,000, and we decided to donate that money to some organisations, BMAC [the Black Music Action Coalition] being the first one.”

In a new report by Rolling Stone, it’s alleged that BMAC – “an advocacy organisation formed to address systemic racism within the music business” – is the only organisation Wallen and his team have reached out to, with $165,000 (or roughly a third of his promised amount) given to them.

Rolling Stone said it contacted 56 other state, regional and national Black-led or Black-founded charities in Tennessee, with none of them able to confirm they’d received any donations under Wallen’s name.

According to the publication, the list of organisations it approached was collated from a range of sources, including “Charity Navigator’s directory of Black-founded nonprofits, numerous roundups of Tennessee charities that were prominent in the aftermath of George Floyd’s murder, and a compendium of Tennessee charities amassed by Give Blck, an organisation that has compiled more than 700 Black-founded nonprofits nationwide”.

Representatives for BMAC issued a statement to Rolling Stone, saying the organisation was “disappointed that [Wallen] has not used his platform to support any anti-racism endeavors”, and called Wallen’s claims that he’d divvy a total of $500,000 between several charities “exceptionally misleading”.

BMAC organisers are reported to have engaged in several meetings with Wallen and his team throughout February and March of this year, during which they “urged [Wallen] to use his platform to do more than just apologise, but to strongly condemn racism and to support anti-racism efforts and initiatives”.

The organisation’s statement to Rolling Stone continued: “We began our interactions with [Wallen] and management being very direct about our feelings on what he had done, and making sure he was crystal clear that the N-word wasn’t some innocuous slang for him to use. Ever. That the word had hatred and violence and blood behind it.

“We also shared with him, through personal stories, how the N-word had impacted Black people. We made clear that if he was open to learning, open to education, open to speaking up, and most importantly, open to helping educate his fans and followers, BMAC would be open to working with him to create awareness campaigns and initiatives around anti-racism. But that he first had to commit to doing the work.”

Rolling Stone also pointed out that although it’s possible Wallen had made further donations anonymously, it isn’t likely, given the singer-songwriter’s history of publicising his charitable efforts. In July, for example, he launched the More Than My Hometown Foundation, with its aim reportedly being to “help children, adolescents, and teenagers find families that can provide warm, loving homes that can rebuild their confidence, self-belief, and to feel forever loved, with a forever family”.

Earlier this month, Wallen performed at a benefit concert, dubbed Morgan Wallen & Friends, to raise funds for those affected by the Humphreys County flood in Tennessee. A press release reported that the effort generated over $725,000 (£530,000).

In a statement provided to Rolling Stone after the initial report was published, Big Loud CEO Seth England claimed that the $500,000 donation came from the label itself, and not Wallen directly.

England said the amount included “$100,000 earmarked and promised for further donations by year end locally”, as well as $100,000 (£73,000) to Rock Against Racism, a nonprofit spearheaded by Slipknot and Megadeth agency 5B Artists + Media.

As for the remaining $300,000 (£220,000), England told Rolling Stone that Big Loud supplied the funds to “BMAC & Other Black Leader’s [sic] organisations of choice” through the Entertainment Industry Foundation, a Los Angeles-based nonprofit.

The post Morgan Wallen reportedly only donated a third of his promised $500,000 to Black-led organisations appeared first on NME.

Genesis ‘Turn It On Again’ at Emotional Reunion Tour Launch in Birmingham

The set featured big hits including “Invisible Touch” and “Land of Confusion” along with surprises like “Fading Lights” and “Duchess”

Music – Rolling Stone

The set featured big hits including "Invisible Touch" and "Land of Confusion" along with surprises like "Fading Lights" and "Duchess"

Courtney Barnett Shouts Out Quivers After Discovering “Completely Coincidental” Music Video Similarities

Barnett said “I would have completely changed my concept” had she seen the Melbourne band’s “You’re Not Always On My Mind” clip while shooting hers for “Before You Gotta Go”

RSS: News

Barnett said “I would have completely changed my concept” had she seen the Melbourne band’s “You’re Not Always On My Mind” clip while shooting hers for “Before You Gotta Go”

Carly Rae Jepsen reflects on ten years of ‘Call Me Maybe’: “it was like a lightning bolt to my little life”

“You have opened my world and my heart with this adventure of a song and I could not be more grateful to you all”

The post Carly Rae Jepsen reflects on ten years of ‘Call Me Maybe’: “it was like a lightning bolt to my little life” appeared first on NME.

NME

Carly Rae Jepsen has celebrated the tenth anniversary of her hit track ‘Call Me Maybe’, sharing an anecdote from her life as a burgeoning pop singer.

Released on September 20, 2011, ‘Call Me Maybe’ was recorded for Jepsen’s EP ‘Curiosity’ and also included on her album ‘Kiss’ a year later. The track, which she described as “a lightning bolt to my little life”, went on to top the charts in multiple countries around the world.

On social media, Jepsen said she was working as a waitress while her music career was getting off the ground, prior to ‘Call Me Maybe’ being released. One day, she overheard a table of 12 mocking one of her earlier songs that was getting radio play, completely unaware they were being served by the singer.

“That night before they left I printed off their bill and signed my name confidently in bold letters on the back of the receipt. I said, ‘Thanks for letting me take care of you tonight! Also, I signed the back of your receipt since I hear you are all such big fans!’,” she wrote.

“Their jaws dropped, we had a laugh and I may have received a slightly bigger tip than usual. The point is, don’t give up on your dreams, kids. Not three months later ‘Call Me Maybe’ was released and let’s just say I hope that song really annoyed them.”

Jepsen went on to thank her fans for “the joyous videos, silly dances and wild nights together in different countries”.

“You have opened my world and my heart with this adventure of a song and I could not be more grateful to you all.”

Jepsen has released three albums in the years since, ‘Emotion’, ‘Dedicated’ and ‘Dedicated Side B’. Shortly after releasing ‘Dedicated Side B’ last year, Jepsen said she had made an entire album during lockdown alongside longtime collaborator Tavish Crowe.

“Tavish and I have already made an entire quarantine album, and it is very different, it’s kind of fun! We had to do it around Zoom or things like that so it’s been like a challenge but a really fun one! You kind of write differently that way,” she told Switched on Pop.

The post Carly Rae Jepsen reflects on ten years of ‘Call Me Maybe’: “it was like a lightning bolt to my little life” appeared first on NME.