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The BBC has introduced warnings about outdated language and social attitudes featured in programmes on iPlayer.

The move follows Netflix‘s recent decision to remove comedies The Mighty Boosh and The League of Gentlemen from its streaming service due to the use of blackface. BBC iPlayer has kept the shows but has added warning messages.

Julian Barratt And Noel Fielding sign copies of their book "The Mighty Book of Boosh"
Julian Barratt And Noel Fielding sign copies of their book “The Mighty Book of Boosh” in Easons O’Connell Street on September 20, 2008 in Dublin, Ireland. CREDIT” Phillip Massey/FilmMagic

Each show now comes with a note saying the shows’ content “reflects the broadcast standards, language and attitudes of its time” and that “some viewers may find this content offensive”.

A message accompanying the recent remake of Alan Bennett’s Talking Heads reads: “This film is set in the 1980s and reflects the language and social attitudes of its time”.

Additionally, HBO Max removed Gone With The Wind last month before reinstating it with a pre-roll disclaimer explaining that the movie “denies the horrors of slavery”.

Gone With The Wind

The film, which starred Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh, was removed after an LA Times op-ed from Oscar-winning 12 Years A Slave screenwriter John Ridley slammed it as “a film that glorifies the antebellum south. It is a film that, when it is not ignoring the horrors of slavery, pauses only to perpetuate some of the most painful stereotypes of people of colour.”

The moves are in response to the Black Lives Matter movement reignited by the murder of George Floyd in May, which strives for racial equality.

The post BBC iPlayer adds warnings to classic comedies removed from Netflix appeared first on NME Music News, Reviews, Videos, Galleries, Tickets and Blogs | NME.COM.

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NME Music News, Reviews, Videos, Galleries, Tickets and Blogs | NME.COM

The BBC has introduced warnings about outdated language and social attitudes featured in programmes on iPlayer.

The move follows Netflix‘s recent decision to remove comedies The Mighty Boosh and The League of Gentlemen from its streaming service due to the use of blackface. BBC iPlayer has kept the shows but has added warning messages.

Julian Barratt And Noel Fielding sign copies of their book "The Mighty Book of Boosh"
Julian Barratt And Noel Fielding sign copies of their book “The Mighty Book of Boosh” in Easons O’Connell Street on September 20, 2008 in Dublin, Ireland. CREDIT” Phillip Massey/FilmMagic

Each show now comes with a note saying the shows’ content “reflects the broadcast standards, language and attitudes of its time” and that “some viewers may find this content offensive”.

A message accompanying the recent remake of Alan Bennett’s Talking Heads reads: “This film is set in the 1980s and reflects the language and social attitudes of its time”.

Additionally, HBO Max removed Gone With The Wind last month before reinstating it with a pre-roll disclaimer explaining that the movie “denies the horrors of slavery”.

Gone With The Wind

The film, which starred Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh, was removed after an LA Times op-ed from Oscar-winning 12 Years A Slave screenwriter John Ridley slammed it as “a film that glorifies the antebellum south. It is a film that, when it is not ignoring the horrors of slavery, pauses only to perpetuate some of the most painful stereotypes of people of colour.”

The moves are in response to the Black Lives Matter movement reignited by the murder of George Floyd in May, which strives for racial equality.

The post BBC iPlayer adds warnings to classic comedies removed from Netflix appeared first on NME Music News, Reviews, Videos, Galleries, Tickets and Blogs | NME.COM.

0 Comments

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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